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Copyright: Creative Commons licences

About Creative Commons licences

Creative Commons licences are suitable for use in publishing all open content and material, excluding computer software, which have their own licences. CC licences have become a practical standard for open publishing.

Publishing with Creative Commons licences does not mean giving up copyrights. It means offering a part of the rights to the user, but only under certain terms and conditions, which the author defines him- or herself.

The terms of CC licences

The default is that the CC licenced work can be copied, distributed, performed and modified freely - without any special permission. The CC licence system consists of four (4) terms. By using and combining these terms author can restrict users' rights.

  BY, ByAttribution → The name of the author must always be mentioned properly. Otherwise the work may be freely used.

  NC, NonCommercial → The work cannot be used commercially. Otherwise the work may be freely used.

  ND, NoDerivatives → The work cannot be modified in any way. Otherwise the work may be freely used.

  SA, ShareAlike → Derivative works can be shared only by the same licence as used in original work.

Creative Commons - Basic licences

Six (6) basic Creative Commons licences are based on four licence terms. Here is presented also a special licence CC 0.

 CC BY (Attribution)

The work can be copied, displayed, distributed and modified freely, including commercial purposes. The name of the author must be mentioned properly. This is the most popular licence for open publishing. It is a suitable licence for example when you want a lot of readers for your work.

 CC BY-SA (Attribution ShareAlike)

The work can be copied, displayed, distributed and modified freely, but possible derivative works must be published with the same licence. This licence is recommended for teaching materials.

 CC BY-ND (Attribution NoDerivatives)

The work can be copied, displayed and distributed, but the work cannot be modified in any way. Possible modifications of the work require author permission. A suitable licence especially for works of art.

 CC BY-NC (Attribution NonCommercial)

The work can be copied, displayed, distributed and modified, but the work cannot be used commercially without a special permission from the author. This licence is recommended to use in situations when the work would probably be utilized commercially and the author wants prevent it.

 CC BY-NC-SA (Attribution NonCommercial ShareAlike)

The work can be copied, displayed, distributed and modified, but only for non-commercial purposes and it must be distributed on the same licence terms.

 CC BY-NC-ND (Attribution NonCommercial NoDerivatives)

The work can be copied, displayed and distributed, but the work cannot be modified in any way. Furthermore the work cannot be used commercially.  This is a suitable licence especially for works of art.

 CC 0 (No Rights Reserved)

The author waives all rights, and there are no restrictions for the use of the work. However, according to Finnish law, the author's name can not be separated from a written or artistic work. In addition, good scientific practice requires that the source be mentioned.

Use of Creative Commons licenced materials

When you use Creative Commons licenced images or other materials, you must comply with the licence terms. The image or other material to be used should contain at least:

  • Author's name
  • Licence with which the work is shared, and a link to the licence
  • Source / link to the original publication
  • Derivative works and variations should include both the original author and the creator of the variation. In addition, it should be stated what each has done. It is also always necessary to ensure that the licence permits the modification of the work.

Choosing Creative Commons licence

You can easily find a Creative Commons licence for your own use by using the licence selector. By combining the licence terms, you can define other users' rights to your work in a way you like.

Using a Creative Commons licence does not require registration or other permission. It is enough to add information about the selected licence to your own work. You can also use the licence selector to define how you will be referred to as the author of the work.

Choosing a CC licence as a process

 

Creative Commons licence selection process is based on Tarmo Toikkanen's image, 2014, CC0.

Licence recommendations

Open Science and Research Initiative of the Ministry of Education and Culture (MINEDU) recommends these licences:

References

Open Science https://avointiede.fi/en

Creative Commons http://creativecommons.org

Helsinki University Library, ResearchGuides https://libraryguides.helsinki.fi/oa/eng/license

Toikkanen, Tarmo & Oksanen, Ville (2011). Opettajan tekijänoikeusopas. Helsinki: Finn Lectura

Turun AMK, Johdatus tiedonhankintaan -opas http://libguides.turkuamk.fi/tiedonhankinnanopas/tiedoneettinenkaytto